When we say 30 or 60 new cards a day, are we talking about 10-20 new "words" and Anki produces 3-4 cards per word? I always took 30-60 to be the number of words/grammar rules and you actually end up with about 3 times more actual cards. I'm almost done, 2-3 days, with my pronunciation trainer so this has relevance to me before I move on to the 625 words. If I shoot for 60 words a day, and end up with 3-4 cards per word *(I am going to add the gender toggle option on nouns)* we're talking 240 cards added to Anki per day-ish. Or is that just information overload?

* Originally posted by LetsPlayThisBro.

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9 comments

  • Hi

    I could be wrong but I've taken it to mean actual cards, not words. 240 new cards a day would be totally overwhelming!

    Adrian

    * Originally posted by mowat27.
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  • On the one hand it would seem so, on the other I think of two things, first I have a lot of time on my hands, I'm physically disabled and can spend 5 hours or more a day on this if I choose to. Second since 3 or 4 of the cards would be on the same word/grammar rule etc... then it wouldn't necessarily be new information just the initial 30-60 cards/words, reviewed 3-4 different ways.

    If I am asked to spell a word, I of course at the same time think of the definition of the word and actually find myself saying it out loud as well. I know it would be a LOT of time to create/review, but I'm going to attempt it and see if I have to ratchet it back or if it is possible.

    Actually I know it's possible, but there's also a comfort level to this, will I be ok with studying 5-6 hours a day? Which is why I'm trying to figure out if Anki would allow reviews to be scheduled every 12 rather than 24 hours.

    Ideally I'd like to wake up, review, take an hour or so break, create cards, take an hour or more break, then review again with the new cards I created shuffled in. Lather, Rinse, Repeat. I'm just not sure what the science says about retaining information when taken in such large chunks. But with my dyslexia more study may end up being better than less, it will force me to engage fully and focus.

    * Originally posted by LetsPlayThisBro.
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  • Hey

    I'm no expert so I don't know, really. I'd love to hear how you get on though.

    Cheers

    Adrian

    * Originally posted by mowat27.
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  • Thanks, I'll be around so hopefully even after the forums/site gets updated I'll keep posting questions/progress etc.

    The one thing I'm going to start adding which is a bit of a departure from Fluent Forever's formula is to just listen to Spanish language programming... TV/Podcasts/YoutubeChannels and as I learn more vocabulary I'll be able to start making sense of it while at the same time getting acclimated to how people speak in real life rather than in a studio where they're intentionally enunciating the words perfectly for our digestion.

    * Originally posted by LetsPlayThisBro.
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  • I'm going a bit off piste too. After a short trip to Italy last week I realised I need to start speaking to get my confidence up so I'm jumping into italki even though I only have about 100 words in my vocabulary

    * Originally posted by mowat27.
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  • I used to do standup comedy and you have to look at conversations in a new language the same ways as going up on stage to try material for the first time.. maybe they'll laugh, maybe they won't, in any case you're doing it for yourself as a learning process so don't be shy about it. You're going to make mistakes, that's good.

    It's like the old adage about a plane flight from L.A. to Hawaii, most of the time the pilot is off course and it's only by looking at where the plane is vs it's intended course and making corrections that you end up on an island in the middle of the ocean. The important part is the corrections, not the errors. This applies to language learning perfectly.

    Good luck and be fearless.

    * Originally posted by LetsPlayThisBro.
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  • Hello LetsPlayThisBro,
    just in case your question was not completely answered yet, when you create a new "note", that note may generate several cards. Usually in our case here at Fluent Forever we have note types that generate 3 cards. When you edit your notes you can press the "Cards..." button and at the top you'll see one tab for each card that will be generated from the note you are editing.

    This means that for each word/note you create, Anki will generate 3 cards. If you "browse" a deck you'll see listed all three of the cards for each note.

    So in theory if you add 10 words a day to a deck, Anki will test you with 30 cards per day.

    Except that normally Anki "buries related new cards until the next day", this means that on the first day you will only encounter the first of the three cards. On the second day you'll be tested on the second (and review the first) and only on the third day you'll encounter the third card.

    This means that if you add 10 words to a deck, on the first day you will only study 10 new cards. On the second day you'll study another 10 new cards and review 10 cards from the preview day and only on the third day you'll be working on all 30 of the cards.

    However, if you want to be tested on all three cards right away you can disable the "burying" feature by accessing the "options" menu next to the deck you wish to edit and uncheck the box for "bury related new cards until next day".

    Hope this clarifies things. Best,
    L

    * Originally posted by Leo_FF.
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  • In terms of how many cards you should create/study every day, I understand you have a lot of time to devote to study. On the other hand, it is very important to consider how much mental endurance you have.

    It is extremely common for students to be very enthusiastic at the beginning of their studies. They commit to spending hours every day studying and for a while they work really hard.

    However, after a few days/weeks they completely burn out. This happens for several reasons. Usually students are focused on the "goal" of becoming fluent. They want this so badly that they imagine if they work hard they can become fluent in less time than it is reasonable. No matter how hard you work, it will still take 3-6 months to be able to have conversations with someone in a foreign language (maybe even 1 year for more difficult languages). So usually after 2-3 weeks of extremely hard work, the student realizes they still can't speak the language and they become discouraged.

    While we believe Fluent Forever is one of the fastest and most effective methods to learn a language, studying a language is still a long process and one of the keys to success is building long lasting (i.e. sustainable) study habits.

    For this reason I would personally encourage students to study significantly less then they want to in the beginning and only gradually increase their study efforts. It is better to study less and stay "hungry", than to study too much and then get completely sick of it.

    Now, how much or how little you should study is hard to say. Only you can make that call as you know yourself better than I do. But I'd just suggest to slow down in the beginning and then gradually increase things.

    In any case, I wish you the best.
    L

    * Originally posted by Leo_FF.
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  • Thanks for all the great advice, I have considered burn-out as an issue. The one thing I'll do if I start to feel I've gotten too deep is to just produce fewer cards, but optimally and I'm not sure how to arrange this yet my day would go like this, morning/wake-up review, noon-ish produce cards, evening/before bed review again. In-between relax, maybe later when I've acquired enough of the language pull up YouTube videos of Spanish news programming as I'm strange and consider news as entertainment.

    I'm going to produce cards on my PC and update the deck and do my reviews on my android tablet, the android app with Anki lets me hit the "replay" button to hear the sound as often as I'd like. This is helpful for me with the spelling in particular as a dyslexic.

    If I get overwhelmed I can skip a day of production as long as I keep reviewing, because as you said the cards produced go through a rotation between similar cards. I also intend to have a 4th card from the note to ask the gender as well, I think it's a good habit to produce them like that especially for when I eventually move on to French and GERMAN.. my language nemesis.

    I'm flexible enough in my plans to extend beyond 6-8 months per language as I've planned because I understand I have a dyslexia issue the information will get in my head, but may take more study time to cram it in. French will present a particular issue for me with the spelling.

    But it's like being on a diet, you eat a salad today and you're not going to be 20lbs lighter tomorrow. So the trick is to create smaller more easily attained goals and celebrate them.. "Yeah this week I learned 150 new words!" I'm doing that with the pronunciation trainer presently, "Alright! I can spell that little pain in the ass word that I couldn't a week ago."

    I mean, how does an infant "stay motivated" to learn their first language, it's by necessity, they'd rather not cry to say "Hey I'm Hungry," or "Hey my diaper is full." I think that's why there's that magic time Gabe speaks about between 6 months/1 year of age that infants have where they can hear sounds more clearly, it's because they're focusing so hard on improving communication beyond crying it makes those connections stronger in their brain for that time period.

    At least that's how I think of it, I could be wrong, but like anything make a mistake, make a correction and eventually I'll get where I need to be.



    * Originally posted by LetsPlayThisBro.
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