The FF Flash Card Methodology for other subjects besides languages

Hi Gabe, I recently stumbled across a video on youtube and heard you speak on the Nelson Dellis show about how you flash carded an entire book. In which you learnt how to properly structured your own book. I have recently done the same thing for different subjects like Biochemistry and the Human anatomy. I have never found the best way to keep me interested. The response Nelson gave in "wow" I too am very interested on how you did that, I assume you used the srs for other things besides languages. I personally would like to hear in more depth on how you managed to do that. Maybe a blog in the future? The possiblities of Anki HA? Were they large chunks or manage sentence-like flash cards from the book, if you can also elaborate more on it and add anything else, that would much appreciated. Regards, PJ

* Originally posted by Paul.

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7 comments

  • @Paul: For non-language topics, you have to start being creative when it comes to flashcard models, though the basic principles are the same as I use for languages (as per: https://fluent-forever.com/create-better-flashcards/ )

    In the case of this particular book, the information was consistently presented as follows:

    Here's sentence A. It sucks.
    Here's sentence B. It's awesome.
    Sentences A and B convey the same information.

    Let's talk about what makes sentence A crappy and sentence B awesome.


    So I did this:

    Better Sentence

    Worse Sentence

    Basically I created a test that required me to know whether a sentence was "good" or "bad" without any context clues other than the sentence itself.

    I chose an image that represented the information contained in both sentences (in this case I used a book, since this sentence is about writing short books). That made the questions more concrete and memorable.

    Then I chose an image that represented the concept I was trying to teach myself, in this case a see-saw symbolizing the idea of balancing parallels in sentences. This makes the concept I'm trying to teach myself more memorable.

    Then I did it 100 more times. :)

    These were the necessary ingredients:
    - I read and understood the source book.
    - I came up with a way to test that understanding, that I'd be able to succeed at immediately after reading the book, but would probably forget the next day.
    - I came up with my own visual reminders of those lessons

    If you use those 3 ingredients in whatever it is you're trying to learn, you'll be able to remember it via SRS.

    The only thing I'd add to that is that complex topics like biochem benefit a LOT from mnemonics and memory palaces. I can actually strongly recommend http://picmonic.com for the former when it comes to medical school - my fiancee is using their stuff and loves it. As for the latter, I might suggest Anthony Metivier's stuff on the subject: http://www.magneticmemorymethod.com. He uses memory palaces a lot more than I do and I think would be a better source for info on them.

    I hope this helps!

    Best regards
    -Gabe



    * Originally posted by Gabriel Wyner.
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  • Hi Gabe thanks for commenting on adapting anki. I'm actually trying to recreate these flashcards to improve my writing, using the same book. I have only used your pre-made decks so I don't have experience making my own deck and as easy as the above looks, it's harder than initially thought without knowing what I'm doing. Would you mind sharing your model card template for the Style Toward Clarity and Grace deck?

    Thanks,

    * Originally posted by ipsofacto.
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  • gabe could you post the deck publicly, please.

    * Originally posted by esudil.
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  • I use Anki for getting better English vocabulary, English being my native language of course. You can essentially create the deck the same way you do with foreign words, can even find the audio pronunciation and plug that in just like you do with FF, an image or a sentence to put the word into context etc. That's not much of a modification. Hard part, just like foreign language learning, is to get a list of words you don't know in your native tongue. I bought a few books to create lists from like 'The Highly Selective Thesaurus for the Extraordinarily Literate' by Eugene Ehrlich, he has a whole series of these to dig up some deep English vocabulary.

    I'm not much of a science learner but I've seen them for simple memorization of the periodic table of elements, anatomy, formulas etc. Anki is a great tool all the way around, I had heard of it before FF, but never used it until FF's language learning method but now I find myself using it for all sorts of things.

    After all to use it with FF you do learn how to use Anki pretty well, and if you're going to spend the time learning how to create cards for foreign language learning why not use that same knowledge to expand other parts of your knowledge base?

    * Originally posted by LetsPlayThisBro.
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  • I finally got around to fooling around with Anki to create the code for these cards:

    You have two card types: Card 1: Better and Card 2: Worse

    FOR BETTER CARD (CARD 1):

    FRONT TEMPLATE:

    Fix this? Why or why not?


    {{Better Sentence}}


    {{Sentence Picture (Front & Back)}}


    STYLING (Shared between cards):

    .card {
    font-family: arial;
    font-size: 14px;
    text-align: center;
    color: black;
    background-color: white;
    }

    BACK TEMPLATE:

    Better: {{Better Sentence}}

    Worse: {{Worse Sentence}}


    Why: {{Explanation}}


    {{Explanation Picture (Back)}}

    {{Sentence Picture (Front & Back)}}



    FOR WORSE CARD (CARD 2):

    FRONT TEMPLATE:

    Fix this? Why or why not?


    {{Worse Sentence}}


    {{Sentence Picture (Front & Back)}}


    STYLING:

    .card {
    font-family: arial;
    font-size: 14px;
    text-align: center;
    color: black;
    background-color: white;
    }


    BACK TEMPLATE:

    Better: {{Better Sentence}}

    Worse: {{Worse Sentence}}


    Why: {{Explanation}}


    {{Explanation Picture (Back)}}

    {{Sentence Picture (Front & Back)}}



    Once you copy and paste in these to your two new cards for this deck, you need to edit the fields within the deck. I named mine "Better Sentence", "Worse Sentence", "Sentence Picture (Front & Back)", "Explanation", "Explanation Picture (Back)". You should name your fields the same as I have here because they correspond to the code I pasted above. Or you could change both but just make sure they're consistent or it won't function properly.

    * Originally posted by ipsofacto.
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  • As you will see in my reply above, there are a few lines that are bolded. What actually was supposed to happen was my paste-in for the bold code for your anki card but the code for this message input were the same. So what you should see around those two lines to make them bold in Anki are and (that is - {strong} and {/strong} where the curly brackets "{}" are actually supposed to be these brackets "<>" in anki, in case they don't show up properly here again).

    * Originally posted by ipsofacto.
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  • @ipsofacto

    Would you mind sharing your model card template using free service like dropbox or utorrent etc

    * Originally posted by esudil.
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